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Newmarket Approves PLANT Architect’s Mulock Park Project

The $40-million project will provide a major new park in the town of Newmarket, Ontario

Mulock Park has received full approval from the Town of Newmarket, Ontario, and is now in Schematic Design by PLANT Architect Inc. The project’s $40-million budget makes it the town’s most ambitious parks project to date.

Mulock Park’s 15-acre site comprises the remaining 11.6 acres of a former 200-acre farm and estate, plus the 3.4-acre Jim Bond Park. Rendering courtesy of PLANT Architect.

This transformation of a former private estate in Newmarket, Ontario, into a four-season public park will include an enhanced wetland and riverine water feature, woodland skate trail and pavilion, conservatory and diversity gardens, artist-in-residence studio, and other features.

Sir William Mulock’s former country home will be renovated to host arts, heritage, and community events. Rendering courtesy of PLANT Architect.

“Mulock Park is a symbiotic integration of architecture and landscape,” says PLANT partner Lisa Rapoport, who leads the Mulock Park design team. “The design we’ve developed in collaboration with Newmarket residents, Town Council, and stakeholders introduces new buildings to the site, preserves the heritage manor house while adapting it to an exciting range of possible new community uses, and focuses on ecological regeneration and the use of the site for many types of cultural activities, as well as passive recreational activities.”

Converted to a conservatory, the garage and stables will be surrounded by gardens honouring the area’s Indigenous history and Newmarket’s diversity. Rendering courtesy of PLANT Architect.

The park will provide green space in a part of town where intensive new residential development is pending. At the same time, Mulock Park is envisioned as a destination that will not only serve the local community but also attract visitors from a much wider area. “We see the park as a network of destinations, linked by trails that will encourage people to explore different parts of the site on each visit,” says Rapoport.

A winter Skate Trail will loop through the woods, and then convert back to a walking trail in spring. Rendering courtesy of PLANT Architect.
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