Canadian Architect

Feature

From Wood to Wallpaper: Tile Trends at Cersaie

From ceramic tiles to kitchen and bathroom furnishings, the annual trade show was ripe with inspiration for the architecture and interior design industries.

February 9, 2017
by Shannon Moore

For the 34th edition of Cersaie, more than 900 exhibitors representing over 30 countries showcased their products to some 100,000 visitors in Bologna, Italy. From ceramic tiles to kitchen and bathroom furnishings, the annual trade show was ripe with inspiration for the architecture and interior design industries.

Among the various collections was an array of both new and returning ideas as companies put a unique spin on styles visible across the showroom floor. Pattern mimicry, glossy geometry, contrasting colours and pop-art looks featured among this year’s industry-favourite trends.

Natural and Noble

Tile that mimics other materials continues to be popular at Cersaie. Casalgrande Padana, for example, exhibited a collection of products inspired by noble Italian woods. Casalgrande’s Greenwood collection contains rich browns and cool greys with texture and depth similar to authentic hardwood floors.

Casalgrande’s Greenwood collection.

Casalgrande’s Greenwood collection.


Tweed and Tartan

Another trend at Cersaie was tiles inspired by fabric textiles. From a tweed-like product that resembles a classic Chanel coat (by Cooperativa Ceramica D’Imola) to tartan tiles with pearlescent and glittery undertones (by Ceramiche Atlas Concorde), fabric-inspired looks appeared throughout the show. Ceramica Sant’agostino embraced the fabric trend through their Tailorart collection, which includes solid and tartan looks suitable for both walls and floors.

Ceramica Sant’agostino's Tailorart collection.

Ceramica Sant’agostino’s Tailorart collection.


Movement and Linearity

With a goal to move beyond the traditional, many exhibitors opted for dynamic tiles that embrace a strong sense of movement, geometry and linearity. Emilgroup and Lea Ceramiche, for example, played with thin straight lines to create interest in a simple, sequential way. Ceramiche Atlas Concorde exhibited contemporary leaf-like patterns in shiny marble and stone finishes. The company also showcased a ripple-effect tile accentuated by a glossy, satin finish.

Lea Ceramiche.

Lea Ceramiche.

Ceramiche Atlas Concorde.

Ceramiche Atlas Concorde.


Colourful and Cartoonish

Similarly inspired to produce eye-catching tiles, many exhibitors opted for colourful products inspired by wallpaper and cartoons. Del Conca Group’s BG Bellagio/Manara line, for example, depicts characters from Italian comic books, while ABK emozioni in superficie, Vallelunga & Co., and 41 Zero 42 take different approaches to a wallpaper-like finish with patterns of flowers, plants, leaves, lace and more.

Del Conca Group’s BG Bellagio/Manara line.

Del Conca Group’s BG Bellagio/Manara line.

41 Zero 42.

41 Zero 42.


Art and Architecture

Many exhibitors showcased collections with obvious ties to art and architecture history. Tiles with Art Deco and Art Nouveau patterns popped up in numerous booths, including Altaeco, whose Eve collection by Ceramica Bardelli in collaboration with interior designer Marcel Wanders is soft and delicate with a vintage touch.

For those who find inspiration in architecture, a number of collections stood out. Gigacer’s LCS Ceramics line of porcelain stoneware tiles is based on Le Corbusier’s Polychromie Architecturale—a palette of colours deemed by the architect to be balanced, structured and aesthetically pure.

Other ties to the architecture industry included a metallic line of tiles used by architect Daniel Libeskind for a multi-storey sculpture called The Crown commissioned by Casalgrande-Padana, and a collection of marble tiles inspired by the work of architect Carlo Scarpa by Ceramica Fioranese.

Altaeco's Eve Collection.

Altaeco’s Eve Collection.

Gigacer’s LCS Ceramics line.

Gigacer’s LCS Ceramics line.

Ceramica Fioranese.

Ceramica Fioranese.


Sustainable Solutions

Amidst the various trends at Cersaie, some companies stood out for their concern with sustainability and for providing green solutions in a unique yet stylish way. Ardogres, for instance, exhibited a line of roof tiles that embrace solar electricity while resembling traditional roofing materials. The slate-like tiles, which are guaranteed for a 50-year period, incorporate embedded photovoltaic cells, resulting in an energy-producing roof that cleverly hides its solar components from sight.

Ardogres.

Ardogres.



Print this page

Related Posts







Have your say:

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*