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CoLLaboratoire announces winners of Concordia bus shelter competition


July 18, 2016
by Canadian Architect

First Prize: Team 35. Image courtesy of Ideasbe

First Prize: Team 35. Image courtesy of Ideasbe

The Concordia University Research Chair IDEAS-BE has announced the prizes for the 2016 international competition by the initiative CoLLaboratoire for the design of an augmented solar powered bus shelter which will be built on the Loyola campus of Concordia University.

This competition was open to young designers and was anonymously judged by respecting the principle of anonymity, part of a series of activities conducted by CoLLaboratoire, a not-for-profit organization based in Montreal. Projects from Canada, France, Brazil, the United States and Iran were submitted to a jury that was presided by Cheryl Gladu, doctoral candidate with an expert jury composed of: professors Cynthia Hammond, Carmela Cucuzzella, Andréas Athienitis, David Theodore and Jean-Pierre Chupin as well as Jennifer Dorner, director of the FOFA Gallery.

“Contrary to the famous aphorism by architectural historian Nikolaus Pevsner who did not recognise the bicycle shelter as architecture, this competition was grounded on the conviction that a bus shelter can, and should be as architectural as a cathedral or even a museum,” said Carmela Cucuzzella.

The winning project will have the opportunity to collaborate directly with researchers from Concordia University, as well as other professional bodies in order to realize the concept for the beginning of 2017 on the Loyola Campus of Concordia University. 

“This unique competition offers a rich diversity of innovative responses by young designers and will be interesting to compare the winning proposal with its technical realization, which will coincide with Montreal’s 375th anniversary,” said Cucuzzella.

In addition to the top 3 prizes, the jury also selected two honourable mentions. Finally, the public was invited to select their favourite project using an online platform resulting in a prize voted in by the public.

CoLLaboratoire congratulates the recipients of the following awards:

  • First Place Award (prize of $1750): Team 35 – Olivier Guertin, Claude Amiot Bédard Paul Desharnais, Julien Duchesne, Vincent Cloutier Laplante, and Philippe Côté
  • Second Place Award (prize of $750): Team 6 – Charles Laurence Proulx and Étienne Guinard
  • Third Place Award (prize of $350): Team 45 – Rachel Tardif and Tatev Yesayan
  • Honorable Mention: Team 41 – Daniela Moro, Gabriel Hildebrand Tomich, Nícolas Marques de Oliveira, Pedro Barros Vieira Junger
  • Honorable Mention: Team 39 – Alessandra Leitão Montani, Giulliano Chiarello Zanlorenzi, Gustavo C. J. Paris, Jean Nkaya Kashala, Juliana Aparecida Hirayama, Larissa Tami Shinohara
  • Popular Vote Award (prize of $250): Team 37 – Jay Han, Anghelos Coulon, Nina Mourtada, Lys Quintero

The main objective of CoLLaboratoire is the elaboration of a series of artistic installations focused on experimentation, as much creative as pedagogical, along Sherbrooke Street in Montreal. The projects selected and realized aim to consider the role of public art and design in increasing awareness of, and engagement in, issues around climate change at the local level.

To view the winning projects, click here.

To see all the projects submitted to the competition, please visit the CATALOGUE DES CONCOURS CANADIENS website.



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  1. […] Cucuzzella, PhD, the CoLLaboratoire team director, quipped, “Contrary to the famous aphorism by architectural historian Nikolaus Pevsner who did not […]

  2. […] Cucuzzella, PhD, the CoLLaboratoire team director, quipped, “Contrary to the famous aphorism by architectural historian Nikolaus Pevsner who did not […]

  3. […] Cucuzzella, PhD, the CoLLaboratoire team director, quipped, “Contrary to the famous aphorism by architectural historian Nikolaus Pevsner who did not […]





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